Downtown Throwdown

Throwdown Movement Standards

Chest to Bar Pull-ups

The arms must be fully extended at the bottom.  At the top, the chest must clearly come into contact with the bar.  Athletes must begin the rep in the bottom position.

Hang Snatch

This movement begins with the athlete deadlifting the barbell and stopping at this position prior to snatching. The athlete may not lower the bar past the knees after deadlifting the weight. The barbell must be received in the overhead squat position and squatting the bar after receiving it is not required. Only the feet may touch the ground during the lift and the athlete may not step out of the lifting area at any time during the lift.

Full Squat Clean

In this movement, the barbell goes from the ground to the front rack position with the athlete passing through a full squat position while the barbell is racked on the shoulders.  The full squat position is achieved when the crease of the hips passes below the top of the knees. The lift is completed when the athlete comes to a,standing position with knees and hips fully extended with the barbell in the front rack position.  Only the feet may touch the ground during the lift and the athlete may not step out of the lifting area at any time during the lift.

Snatch

In this movement, the barbell goes from the ground to the overhead position. The lift is completed when the athlete comes to a standing position with knees and hips fully extended with the barbell overhead and the arms fully extended at the elbows and shoulders. Squatting the bar after it is received is not required. Only the feet may touch the ground during the lift and the athlete may not step out of the lifting area at any time during the lift.

The Jerk

Each rep begins with the barbell being taken out of the rack in the front rack position and finishes with the weight fully locked out overhead and over the middle of the body.  A shoulder press, push press, push jerk or split jerk may be used, as long as the elbow, shoulder, hips and knees are fully extended, and the bar finishes directly over the body with the feet in line.

Overhead Squat

Each rep begins with the barbell being taken out of the rack in the back rack position and finishes with the weight fully locked out overhead and over the middle of the body. From the back rack position the bar will be pressed overhead and proceed to squat until the crease of the hip passes below the top of the knee. The lift is completed when the athlete comes to a standing position with knees and hips fully extended with the barbell overhead and the arms fully extended at the elbows and shoulders.

Clean and Jerk

In this movement, the barbell goes from the ground to the front rack position then to the overhead position and is completed when the athlete comes to a standing position with knees and hips fully extended with the barbell overhead and the arms fully extended at the elbows and shoulders. It is not necessary to pass through a full squat.

Rowing

This exercise will be done for calories or distance and the athlete may not leave the rower until the required number of calories or distance has been achieved.

Thruster

This is a standard barbell thruster in which the barbell moves from the bottom of a front squat to full lock out overhead. The bar starts on the ground. No racks allowed. The hip crease must pass below the knees. A full squat clean into the thruster is allowed if the bar is on the ground.The barbell must come to full lockout overhead with the hips, knees and arms fully extended, and the bar directly over the heels.

Pull Up

This is a standard pull-up. Dead-hang, kipping or butterfly pull-ups are all allowed as long as all the requirements are met.  The arms must be fully extended at the bottom.  At the top, the chin must break the horizontal plane of the bar. Sets of repetitions must begin in the dead hang position, jumping into the first rep is not permitted.

Double Under

This is a standard double-under in which the rope passes twice for each jump. Only successful jumps are counted, not just attempts.

American Kettlebell Swings

The American Kettlebell Swing begins with the kettlebell below the waist with the elbows locked out and forearms in contact with the body.  The kettlebell is brought to an overhead standing position with the knees, hips and elbows locked out with the shoulders fully flexed  bringing the kettlebell over the center of the body.  Finish the rep by bringing the kettlebell back to the starting position.

Toes-to-Bar

In the toes-to-bar, the Athlete must go from a full hang to having the toes touch the pull-up bar. Both feet must be in contact with the bar at the same time, inside the hands. The arms and hips must be fully extended at the bottom and the feet must be brought back behind the bar and behind the body.

Wall Ball

In the Wall ball, the medicine ball must be taken from the bottom of a squat, hip crease below knee, and thrown to hit the specified target. Using an additional ball, box or other object to check for proper depth is not allowed. If the ball is not caught between reps, it must come to a full stop on the ground. Bouncing the ball off the floor is not permitted.  The center of the ball must hit the target at or above the specified target height. If the ball hits low or does not hit the wall it is no rep.

Box Jump

Every rep must begin with both feet on the floor. The rep finishes with the hips and knees fully open while in control on top of the box.  You may jump or step up or down as long as both feet start on the ground and both feet end on the box in control.  Only the bottoms of your feet may touch the top of the box and using your hands to assist your accent by placing them on any part of your body below your navel is a no rep.

Rope Climb

The rope climb begins with both feet on the ground and athletes must ascend the rope to touch the chain above the rope.  For males, the use of your legs to assist you while you climb the rope is a no rep.  The repetition ends when the athlete returns to the bottom of the rope and both feet are in contact with the ground.

Burpee Box Over

The burpee box over begins with a burpee, then the athlete traverses their box and begins the next repetition.  The burpee begins by dropping to the ground with the chest and thighs in contact with the ground at the same time.  The athlete will then rise back to the standing position and traverse their box by stepping up, jumping up, or jumping over the box.  Standing up on top of the box is not required but only the bottoms of the feet are allowed to touch the top of the box and the athlete’s entire body must pass over the top of the box.

Handstand Pushup

The movement begins at the top of a handstand with the arms fully locked out, the heels on the wall, and the hands placed on top of 45# plates and all fingers on top of the plate. The plates and the AbMat between must remain in contact with the wall and the plates must remain in contact with the AbMat. At the bottom of each rep, the head touches the AbMat. At the top of each rep, the arms return to fully locked out with the heels on the wall and within the width of the plates. Kipping is allowed.

Tuhey Pool

Pool Workouts: The Next Level of Awesome!

Tuhey Pool

Tuhey Pool

Partnering Up to Get Down!

This Summer we are partnering up with White River Aquatics and Tuhey Pool in Muncie to offer a series of 13 pool workouts to our members!  The workouts start this Thursday, June 5th and alternate every Tuesday and Thursday for the rest of the Summer.  These workouts will be at our 6, 7, 8 & 9AM sessions only so plan ahead and bring your swimsuit and goggles.

Taking it to the Next Level

Pool workouts offer a whole new level of intensity for CrossFitters.  The cardiovascular demands of swimming and the added resistance of water to ordinary movements make these workouts the mac-daddy of metabolic conditioning!  Combine the pool with dry-land exercise and you get the 1-2 punch combo that will accelerate your fitness like never before.  Make no mistake, we aren’t talking about the dog days of summer here, laying out by the pool soaking up the sun, this is hard work in the water.

Next-Level Fitness for Everyone

As always, our workouts are scalable to all fitness levels.  So don’t worry about the workouts being too hard or not being able to swim like Michael Phelps.  Bring your swimsuit and goggles and come to the pool workouts this summer!

Pool Workout dates*:

June – 5, 10, 19 & 24

July – 3, 8, 17, 22 & 31

August – 5, 14, 19 & 28

*These pool workouts are outdoors, so the weather may cause us to cancel them.  Don’t worry, we have backup workouts for every pool workout! We will meet up at The Arsenal for all Pool Workouts unless otherwise stated in the workout on the Daily WoD.

The CrossFit Games Open at The Arsenal — Why should I do this?

Before we (John and BJ) give you some solid rationale for why YOU (Mom, athlete, dad, son, grandma, grandpa, new, old, etc.) should compete in the CrossFit Games Open, please watch the short video below:

1. YOU earned the right to compete!

That’s right.  Even if you are in week one of your CrossFit training life, you deserve this because you’ve made a commitment to yourself.  You are a part of a global community, and this is the annual event that celebrates that reality.  This event connects you to virtually every CrossFitter around the world, and enables an even greater level of community than you experience in our  box day to day.

2.  True benchmarks of your progress

If this is your first go around at The CrossFit Games Open, then you’re going see that each of the 5 workouts released will be rigidly scored by one of the coaches at your affiliate (in your case, Muncie CrossFit).  This will be a clean, effective and true evaluation of where you are at right now with your fitness and the quality of your movements.

3.  It is for EVERYONE, even non-members of The Arsenal

We are going to invite every person who signs up for the CrossFit Games Open, to come in and get their official workout judged here at The Arsenal.  We will host 5 dedicated sessions for non-Arsenal members throughout the 5 weeks of the open.  This is a big deal because anyone who completes their workout at an affiliate does not have to submit video evidence of their score.  Otherwise, the athlete will need to take a strictly enforced video to submit as proof of their score.  If you are elite already, and are likely going to make it to the Central East CrossFit Games Regional, then you will need video evidence of each workout regardless.  However, that will be a reality for only a handful of athletes in Delaware County.

Here’s what you’ll need to do:

1. Learn more about the CrossFit Games on the official CrossFit Games website here.

2. Ask a staff member about specialized assessment and training for the 2014 CrossFit Open.

Schedule yourself for Open Workout 14.1 via this link. We will open our doors to the public on Friday, February 28th at 10am for 14.1.  Members can sign up for many more available times via our calendar!

We will be hosting a CrossFit Games Open fireside chat at The Arsenal on 1.15.2014 at 8:15 PM to answer questions and to allow everyone to sign up for the open that night.  It happens to be the first day you are able to sign up, why not celebrate it and do it together!  This will also be the time and place to ask any questions or voice any concerns you may have about competing in the open or how we will conduct open workouts at The Arsenal.

This is a BIG DEAL for anyone in the CrossFit community, and we are so excited to be an affiliated host site for such a fun, challenging and global demonstration of the sport of fitness.  See you all on the 15th!

The horrible truth about elite training

Recently I’ve been immersed in visiting fellow CrossFit affiliates, going to coaching and athlete camps, reading the best literature by the greatest coaches walking Earth and there is a theme emerging.  The theme is that the ideas at the pillars of elite training are, well… dull and boring.  So much so that we tend to just ignore them.  Coach Dan John should be credited with that simple statement.

Olympic Lifts:  Snatch, clean and jerk.  Power lifts:  Squat, bench press and deadlift.  Classic exercises/gymnastics:  Pull-ups, burpees and push ups.

The fact remains that most of us cannot effectively complete these lifts in repetition with a PVC pipe, let alone throw serious weight.  The downside of a WOD, is that it is the expression of movements that each of us should be competent in before we add load or even consider Rx.

Rule of Thumb:  If I cannot execute the lift effectively with a PVC bar, I am not ready to WOD/Met-con with any additional weight.  

A Crossfit workout is the result of effective, repetitive, consistent, methodical, deliberate and exhaustive practice of the pillars of elite training.  We don’t WOD to get better at these movements, we WOD to use these movements as utility in metabolic conditioning.  We come to WOD because it is fast paced, competitive and interesting.  We ignore the fundamentals because they are dull, repetitive and boring.   Can you now see why we see such heinous images of people attempting a WOD before they have demonstrated competence in these movements?  (If you question this just type Crossfit into YouTube and brace yourself)

Here is your take home assignment:  

1. Write down the lifts/movements that you cannot demonstrate competency.  Write down the answer of this question under that list:  How many minutes have I deliberately trained these movements in the past week?

2. Present this list to your coach at The Arsenal.  We will then prescribe a training plan to build your competence in those lifts/movements.

We will not get better and remain healthy if we do not demonstrate competent execution of these lifts/movements every day, every WOD, all the time at The Arsenal.  For those nursing injuries, ask yourself, what is the likelihood that I was executing the lift/movement effectively?  If you have even a question about your confidence, ask a coach to put eyes on your lift.  That is why we are here.

The good news is that we are getting significantly better as group, but there are a percentage of us whose egos and concern about appearance are getting in the way of competence in the pillars of elite training.

Ask yourself:  Am I that person?